Jimmy Raiford wins the Xerox Foundation Rodriguez award

James Raiford, BS Chem. Engr. class of ’16,  has won this year’s Xerox Foundation/ Rodriguez award for excellence in undergraduate research in polymers and/or semiconductors. Jimmy’s award was based on his creativity and academic boldness in helping to create new reactive models for solar cell materials. Jimmy will be starting his PhD studies at Stanford this Fall. He received an Honorable Mention in this year’s NSF Graduate Research Fellowship program.

The award honors Prof. Ferdinand Rodriguez, a Cornell CBE professor, who was a chemical engineering pioneer in the use of polymers in semiconductor applications in the ’70s-’90s. He was also a dedicated mentor to SHPE students.

Emily Cheng receives Cornell ELI award for undergraduate research

ChengEmilyEmily Cheng has received a Cornell Engineering Learning Initiatives award for planned studies of the laser annealing of wide band gap III-V nitrides. She has been learning her trade this academic year in Professor Mike Thompson’s research lab under the mentorship of Tori Sorg, a Clancy group member. The ELI funds from Intel will allow Emily to spend the summer measuring and characterizing laser absorption in GaN and determining the temperature reached as a function of the laser power, wavelength and dwell (duration).  Wide band gap materials show promise for electronic and optoelectronic applications because of their outstanding optical, electronic and thermal properties. Emily’s project with Tori  will help define an appropriate dopant activation strategy that is currently a major challenge to integrating III-V nitrides in electronic devices.

Nikita Sengar accepted into the CBE PhD program.

nikita_pic2Congratulations to current MS student, Nikita Sengar, who has been admitted to the PhD program. Nikita is one of only 12 students in the inaugural class of terminal MS degree students. And she is one of a select few applicants who have excelled in both graduate-level coursework and research accomplishments sufficient to be offered a place in the PhD program. Nikita already has a paper in preparation on her work to provide the mechanism by which contorted OBCB molecules selectively bind to certain chiralities of carbon nanotubes. This work has been done in conjunction with our collaborators in Lynn Loo’s group at Princeton. Nikita previously won a CECAM scholarship to attend a molecular simulation workshop in Germany.

James Stevenson wins the Austin Hooey award for thesis excellence.

james_headshotThe Cornell CBE department’s highest award for thesis excellence is named the Austin Hooey prize. This year, we are thrilled that James Stevenson has been named as a winner of this award. James is already a winner of AIChE’s CoMSEF Graduate Student award for outstanding research in 2015. He is the author of four published papers, including one in Science Advances cited by reviewers as “highly important” and that became one of that new journal’s top 10 papers of the year in 2015. At least two more important papers are in preparation. The breadth of his research deserves a mention: He has contributed to our understanding of Titan’s biochemistry, the formation of chalcogenide quantum dots in solution, and for metal halide perovskites, and algorithmic development and new inter- and intra- molecular force fields.   The Hooey award also recognizes service to the group and the community and James has done this “in spades.” In the group, he led and carefully mentored his own team of four graduate students and six undergraduates to many awards and great success. He spent a year volunteering at the Sciencenter, helping K-12 students to create a presentation about energy to the young Sciencenter visitors and their parents.  This has certainly been a banner year for the Clancy group this year, winning the Austin Hooey prize in 2015 (Saathoff) and again in 2016 (Stevenson).

Jonathan Saathoff’s new ACS Nano paper shows that graphene nanoribbon-based devices can show electron transport.

GNR band gap graphicThis exciting new paper in ACS Nano is a collaboration between the research groups of Profs. Will Dichtel, who synthesized the graphene nanoribbons from the “bottom up,” and Lynn Loo, who made the devices and the Clancy group. Our contribution involved showing the strongly deleterious effect of misaligned nanoribbons on the band gap of the system and the fact that the side-chains play little or no role in the electronic properties, except by keeping the GNRs apart.

Gao, F. Uribe-Romo, J.D. Saathoff, H. Arslan, C. R. Crick, S. J. Hein, B. Itin, P. Clancy, W.R. Dichtel and Y.-L. Loo, Accumulation mode electron transport in transistors of solution-synthesized and structurally precise graphene nanoribbons, ACS Nano, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.6b00643 (2016).

Yaset Acevedo’s new Langmuir paper shows that 3D growth is inevitable for C60 deposited on pentacene, but lower temperature growth is unexpectedly smoother!

Figure_TOC5Ace’s paper in Langmuir used a variety of complementary multiscale methods: molecular-scale coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics, mesoscale Kinetic Monte Carlo, and a novel continuum method to uncover the strengths and limitations of these methods to study heteroepitactical growth (i.e, growth of A on B where A and B have different preferred crystal structures). The 3D growth and the unexpected tendency for lower temperature growth to produce smoother films was also seen in experiments by Breuer and Witte.

Y. M. Acevedo, R.A. Cantrell, P. G. Berard, D. L. Koch and P. Clancy, Multiscale Simulation and Theoretical Description of Multilayer Heteroepitactic Growth of C60 on Pentacene, Langmuir, 32(12), 3045-3056 (2016)

Congratulations to Henry, Blaire, Ryan and Jimmy as Honorable Mentions in the 2016 NSF Grad Fellowship competition

The Clancy group was well represented this year in the highly competitive NSF Graduate Research Fellowship competition.

All of our candidates received an Honorable Mention: Graduate students Henry Herbol, Ryan Heden and Blaire Sorenson, and undergraduate researcher James Raiford. An NSF GRF Honorable Mention is a meaningful distinction among the over 17,000 STEM applicants. It carries with it an allocation on NSF’s supercomputer XSEDE facilities, which is sure to be well used by them all.

Congratulations Blaire, Henry, Ryan and Jimmy!

Clancy group UG researcher, Jovana Andrejevic, wins NSF Grad Fellowship

Jovana Andrejevic (left) and James Raiford at their TechCon poster session in Fall 2015

Jovana Andrejevic (left) and James Raiford at their TechCon poster session in Fall 2015

Applied and Engineering Physics senior undergraduate, Jovana Andrejevic, has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. Jovana has been working in the Clancy group in CBE for the past two years, creating a new approach to modeling chemically reactive species for quantum dot nucleation and growth, mentored by Clancy PhD student, James Stevenson. Jovana’s work resulted in a first-author publication in J. Chem. Theor. & Computation in 2016. She is active at Cornell as a physics tutor, as an outreach coordinator for SWE, and manages part of Cornell’s Community Center program. She is the winner of several Cornell awards, including the Rhodes Scholarship and a Cornell Engineering Alumni Association award. The NSF graduate fellowship is awarded to just ~2,000 outstanding students out of ~17,000 applicants across all STEM fields. Jovana will be attending graduate school in Fall 2016.

Mardochee Reveil (Clancy Group) Wins Best Poster at the Cornell’s Nanofabrication Facility Annual Meeting 2015

Annual Meeting [CNF]

Annual Meeting [CNF]Annual Meeting [CNF]

 

(Cornell University Photography)

Mardochee Reveil from Paulette Clancy’s research group at Cornell won the Best Poster award at the 2015 annual meeting of Cornell’s Nanofabrication Facility. His poster, “Characterizing the Behavior of Van der Pauw Devices under non-Ideal Conditions,” featured his innovative computational work to understand how the performance of van der Pauw devices is affected by changes in the size and shape of the contact as the contact dimensions are decreased. These devices are a commonly used way to determine thin film sheet resistances. Reveil has a Masters degree from Syracuse University and is currently a PhD candidate in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Cornell. He works closely with our experimental partner group, led by Prof. Michael O. Thompson (Mat. Sci.& Engr.), focusing on understanding dopant activation and diffusion in InGaAs.